“Heinzelmänchen”, the German Dwarfs / Gnomes. [2]

PLEASE NOTE:

I DO NOT DO VALUE ($$$’s) APPRAISALS! There are way too many variables: condition, location, time of year, present trends in stein collecting, local (and now national) economics; but most of all = prior expectations by the owner, are among the reasons!

I have for over a year now placed these short “notifications” at the bottom of each page! It is now obvious to me the general public never gets that far before wanting to ask me a question on beer stein dollar values. So I have had to move them forward as I am getting tired of copying them and sending them back to people as an answer to their “stein value” questions. This was meant to be an informational web site only.

NOR WILL I KNOWINGLY DO ASSESSMENTS for the future selling of steins on auction sites such as eBay, etc. Go to the web site for “Stein Collector’s International” and click on “Stein Talk,” someone there might help you. I just do not have the time! My web site was really started as an informational site for beginning beer stein collectors that would be looking for the info and not the general public. This site has its own search engine [top right on each page!] SO if one puts in “Wood Steins” or “Hand painted steins,” it will give one a list of all the pages that has that subject matter within it.

STILL WISH TO CONTACT ME ABOUT ANY INFORMATION ON THIS SITE?  EMAIL:  STEVE (STEPHEN)  = thevirginian@cox.net

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A V &B Mettlach, PUG stein showing gnomes playing one of their favorite games, “Kegels”  or “9 Pins.”

An early (Circa 1865-75) Westerwald (not Regensburg!) salt-glazed stoneware stein. Some stein collectors call these “Mud” steins, which is of course very appropriate!

 

A simple .5 liter porcelain with a pewter base rim though.

Bored?  Try this at home. But don’t let your wife walk in on you, she might get the wrong impression! [From the gnome museum in Germny.]  This is really a butcher gnome trying to get the pig ready to slaughter!  (Yeah……. right, Smith!)

Lidless stein by Merkelbach and Wick [M & W, Gr.] – part of a Gnome series, see below.

As above but “Mit deckel.”

1/2 liter Merkelback & Wick.  [SC]

Two gnomes carrying the “weather frog” in a bottle. The position of the frog on the ladder can tell the weather forecast. .5 liter pottery stein.

    

Same scene as above, but  on a 1/4th liter stein, with an interesting molded tin lid and a tin spade as a thumblift.

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Detail

I think this gnome finial on this .5 l porcelain steins is glazed; while most were left in the parian stage.

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.25 liter pottery relief, one of the few that show them eating at a table. It comes in a colored version also.

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A well done “true Regensburg”  serving stein.The decor is called “threaded relief” by SCI collectors which implies small threads of “slip” were added to the surface; but the designs were really pressed into the stein by using molds. Circa 1880, but it looks a lot older.

 

This is close to being the matching stein of the server above, if not it. Looks very well done esp. with the pewter base rim.

While looking very Germanic, this one liter stoneware stein  was made by the Whites firm in Utica New York. Ca. 1890 1907. As Whites were true American made ceramics there is a large crossover buying market for their products.

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Below: these two Kinder mugs show “trolls” – not our fun loving old gnomes or Heinzelmänchen.

   

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The German / Scandinavian Gnome King “Andvari,” being carried on a beer barrel to a waiting party.

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Detail: a very interesting little piece of folk art. 

Along the same line , this time to a New Year’s party. Scratch-marked “Stockholm,” and not dated, but around 1890- 1910 I think. Hand painted wood.  6.5 inch. Note in detail the champagne bottle is 3 quarters as big as the carrier.

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A 1/2 liter copper wheel cut clear glass stein. A gnome pulling a sled, with a gnome thumblift also! Circa 1880.

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A large = 13.5 inches tall [x] 5.45 inches wide, hand carved and painted Scandinavian wooden tankard with “ball and claw” feet. This is not a “peg” tankard.  Carved body figures with a stippled background. I’ll SWAG this to be Circa 1850. The large gnome as the thumblift may be Representative of  “The gnome king: Andvari.” Excellent condition. (Comps of J. Johnson = “Mr. Lucky”.)

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[END – SOK –  23 – NOR5]

WISH  TO CONTACT STEPHEN?  = thevirginian@cox.net

  “Obituaries would be a lot more interesting if they told you exactly how the person died!”